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South Park Ese Essay Episodes

"D-Yikes!" is the sixth episode of Season Eleven, and the 159th overall episode of South Park. It aired on April 11, 2007.[1]

Synopsis

Ms. Garrison gets dumped again, after complaining about men she is told about lesbianism. Unfortunately, the lesbian bar Les Bos has been bought by Persians.

Plot

Ms. Garrison enters her classroom as her students are settling in, and vents some anger she had built up for a bad blind date she had the night before. She yells and insults the students, just before assigning their homework, which will be to read 'The Old Man and the Sea,' and to write an essay about it over the weekend and have it finished by Monday. Stan, Kyle, Kenny and Cartman are not happy about the fact they will have to spend their whole weekend doing homework, but Cartman has a plan that will fix their problem. Cartman brings the three others to the back of a truck rental place, where a group of Mexicans are located. Cartman tells them to read the book, and write four different essays for them, and the boys go off to enjoy their weekend.

Meanwhile, Mrs. Garrison goes to the all-female gym Curves to work out, and still release some built up anger. As she curses out men on the treadmill, a woman named Allison gets onto the treadmill beside her, and the two strike up a conversation, sharing a common dislike of men. Allison then invites Mrs. Garrison down to the all female bar, Les Bos. It doesn't take Mrs. Garrison to long to realize though that Les Bos is a Lesbian Bar, and runs off to the bathroom horrified. Allison follows her, and the talk the two have makes Mrs. Garrison wonder about her sexuality, and the two end up kissing, and then having sex all night.

The four boys return on Monday morning to the Mexicans out back by the Truck Rental place to pick up their essay from the Mexicans. The Mexicans read the books, but did not write essays. Instead, they wrote to their esses (Friends). The boys blame Cartman for the misunderstanding, and they find out at school everyone else did their book reports. They are surprised though when Mrs. Garrison gives them more time for their report. She then tells her students that she is gay, to which Stan replies "Again?" The class likes this newfound personality in their teacher, and encourages her in her choice.

That night Mrs. Garrison returns to Les Bos, a lot more confidently then the night before. She makes small talk with people, but then gets into a fight with another lesbian, which is interrupted when a woman comes in and tells them some bad news. Les Bos is being closed down for good, because it is being bought out by Persians. Herbert Garrison is not happy about this, and refuses to leave. She brings the lesbians to Mayor McDaniels to try and save Les Bos, but the mayor sends them away from her office. Mrs. Garrison does not give up though, and encourages her fellow lesbians not to give up hope. A Persian representative visits Les Bos to talk to the lesbians, to try and reason with them, but has to deal with Mrs. Garrison. After meeting heavy resistance from the woman at the bar, the Persian says, "Look, we don't have to offer you anything. So, I don't know why you’re being so difficult, this is crazy!"

Mrs. Garrison responds with, "No. This isn't crazy. THIS IS LES BOS!" (A parody of a famous line from the movie 300) and then kicks the Persian representative in the balls. Because of this, the fact the lesbians were refusing to give up their bar hit the news, and lesbians everywhere began to support their fight. The Persian representative returned to his co-workers, and told them of how the 30 Lesbians were refusing to give up the bar, and so called more Persians for help. The Persians prepared for an attack, and charged Les Bos, and the Lesbians that stood outside. The fight that followed only involved pushing and shoving back and forth, and in the end the Persian grew tired and retreated. The lesbians celebrated their victory, as the Persian returned to their HQ, where they confronted their boss, Raluf Xerxes. Xerxes gets angry, and decides he must confront the Lesbians himself.

At Les Bos, Mrs. Garrison comes up with a plan to send in Mexicans to Club Persh, the Persian base, and dig up any information they can to use against the Persians. A full day passed, and the lesbians were getting tired. To keep them energetic, Mrs. Garrison made coffee, and after that the Mexicans came back with some valuable information on Xerxes. When Xerxes arrives and confronts Mrs. Garrison, who reveals that they know Xerxes is actually a woman, and threaten to expose her secret. When Mrs. Garrison tells her that lesbians accept woman no matter who they are or how they look, Xerxes is delighted, and ends up having sex with Mrs. Garrison. Xerxes then decides to let Les Bos stay, and the lesbians celebrate.

When Allison question Mrs. Garrison why she isn't teaching right now, she tells her that the school hired someone to fill in for her, which turn out to be the Mexicans who are teaching the class Math, and Kyle says he is actually learning something for once.

References

But the season also targeted the rise of Donald J. Trump, a phenomenon who has thrived on a resentment of things p.c., just this week crowing that his plan to ban Muslims from the United States was “probably not politically correct.” A longtime character, Mr. Garrison, begins a White House bid on a familiar-sounding platform of xenophobia against Canadians (recurring boogeymen of “South Park,” going back to the “Blame Canada” number from the 1999 movie musical). Canada, in turn, has elected its own Trump-like figure, with disastrous results. “We thought it was funny,” one Canadian laments. “Nobody really thought he’d ever be president!”

In reality, Canada has a prime minister. But “South Park” has never cared much about political fine points so much as comedy that deflates zealots and defends the offensive, like an American Charlie Hebdo. It was ahead of the curve in asserting a right to depict the Prophet Muhammad, who appeared in a 2001 episode (though Comedy Central squelched later attempts).

Now, it was as if our culture had been shining an Eric Cartman-shaped Bat-signal and “South Park” answered. You could see the news from college campuses — safe spaces, trigger warnings — and conclude that America was more radically leftist than ever. You could read a dispatch from the Republican primary — border walls, refugee panic — and conclude that it was more reactionary than ever. The country is deeply polarized, and between two poles is precisely where the quasi-libertarian “South Park” most likes to swing.

“South Park” used to be so anti-continuity — its episodes are often written days before airing — that the show would kill the same character, Kenny McCormick, every week. By shifting toward serial stories, Mr. Parker and Mr. Stone have been able to make more complex arguments this season: acknowledging, for instance, that sometimes outrage culture has a basis in actual outrages. An episode on police brutality posits both that South Park’s cops are needed to keep the peace and that many of them joined the force to have carte blanche to beat up minorities.

And where past “South Park” satires once looked at single issues, this season is sketching something like a grand — if messy — unified theory of anger, inequality and disillusionment in 2015 America.

Even as the p.c. wars rage, the town of South Park is being gentrified: It’s attracted a Whole Foods and built Sodosopa (South of Downtown South Park), an enclave of hipster eateries and condos built literally around the house of the dirt-poor McCormick family. The townspeople are delighted, until they realize many of them can’t afford to join the few, the smug, the artisanal. Under the town’s chichi new facade is a familiar slurry of resentment (of the privileged, of immigrants, of elites) and fear (of terrorism, of crime, of economically falling).

And all that, in the “South Park” worldview, drives people to a self-pitying narcissism that extends to politics but also goes beyond it. In the season’s darkest episode, “Safe Space,” the townspeople assign a single child to filter every negative comment from their social media, to protect their self-esteem from all manner of “-shaming.”

After the boy nearly dies from the strain of filtering the entire Internet’s hate, an allegorical figure named Reality — wearing a silent-movie villain’s cape and mustache — shows up to scold South Parkers with a lecture that sums up this season’s Swiftian brimstone morality: “I’m sorry the world isn’t one big liberal-arts college campus! We eat too much. We take our spoiled lives for granted. Feel a little bad about it sometimes.”

Affected by his words, the citizens are moved to action: They take Reality to the town square and hang him.

It’s not exactly subtle, nor is the show’s argument entirely focused; the season-ending arc has involved a tangent about deceptive online advertising. (The finale may be more timely. Only a week after the terrorist shooting in San Bernardino, Calif., the episode promises a story on how “the citizens of South Park feel safer armed”; a teaser video has Cartman getting in an armed standoff with his mother at bedtime.)

And by making P. C. Principal and friends white dudes, the show sidesteps the fact that “politically correct” is often a label lobbed by white dudes at women and minorities who’ve faced actual prejudice. Mr. Parker and Mr. Stone anticipate this criticism too, having Cartman tell his schoolmate Kyle, with atypical self-awareness: “We’re two privileged straight white boys who have their laughs about things we never had to deal with.”

This product of two white guys does have a different vantage point from many of today’s best comedies dealing with identity issues, from “black-ish” to “Master of None.” But in a way, its project and theirs are the same: to deal with tensions by prescribing more conversation, even if it’s uncomfortable, not less.

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